Clarion call for 'renewal'.


Queensland's Labor Government, under Premier Anna Bligh, has been returned to power for another term.  In her election night speech, she acknowledged that the swing against Labor had given a strong message to the government, and gave an undertaking for renewal within cabinet and the process of government..  We can hope that this promised renewal, and the extraordinarily strong position that the Premier now has as Australia's first elected female head of state, means that she can show some real strength in correcting some of the situations she inherited from the former Beattie administration.  In particular, she gave an undertaking to 'the regions' for a better performance by government on regional issues. A good place to start would be in the electorates north of Brisbane where Labor lost every single seat in the entire region...

One 'regional' issue that must be very obvious to the new government team is the Traveston Crossing Dam proposal.  The former Minister for Sustainability,  Andrew MacNamarra, specifically named it as one of the key factors in losing his seat of Hervey Bay.  A look at the electoral map shows that Labor lost every single electorate in the region north of Brisbane where the proposed dam and water infrastructure was an election issue.  In this 'region'  the voters in the seats of Buderim, Bundaberg, Burnett, Caloundra, Glasshouse, Gympie, Hervey Bay, Kawana, Maroochydore, Maryborough, Nanango, Nicklin, Noosa made their feelings very obvious to the government at the ballot box.  There is not one hint of Labor red on the electoral map in the entire region, not even in the high-growth, highly urbanized coastal cities of the Sunshine Coast.

As a Premier with a responsibility to all Queenslanders, not just those in the Labor held seats in Brisbane and outer suburbs, we ask Anna Bligh to listen to this clear clarion call from this 'region',  Something is very wrong in the way that people in these electorates have been treated by successive Labor governments.  Perhaps some of the promised 'renewal' in the way that the Queensland Government intends to go about its business over the next few years can start here. 

A better solution to SEQ water security, one that all Queenslanders can support, one that doesn't destroy another river system, one that doesn't include a dam at Traveston Crossing. That  would be the sort of renewal that would live up to the election night rhetoric.  A loss of every single seat in the region cannot be regarded as a mandate for "more of the same".